In The News - Volume 1 - Issue 12 - October 1, 2015

2015 Organ Donation Congress and World Organ Donation Day
The final program has been finalized and is now available on the ISODP 2015 website (www.isodp2015.org). A big thank you to Jongwon Ha and Guenter Kirste for putting together an excellent program featuring many renowned speakers. The congress will be proceeded by the World Day for Organ Donation and Transplantation on October 17 [Details].

Our International Headquarters are moving!
On October 1, the administrative offices of TTS will be moving to new building. Click here for our new address and to update your address book.

Failed replications put STAP stem-cell claims to rest
Multiple labs conclude that the seemingly miraculous results originated from contamination with ordinary stem cells. A revolutionary way of making stem cells claimed last year by Japanese and US researchers never existed in the first place. That is the conclusion of two papers1, 2 published on 23 September in Nature — the same journal that published the original, ill-fated papers early last year. [MORE]

Call for law change to address heart transplant shortfall
A change in the legal definition of death could see an increase in the number of hearts available for transplant in Australia. In a paper published in today’s Medical Journal of Australia, Deakin University Law School lecturer Dr Neera Bhatia and Deputy Director of the Intensive Care Unit at Royal Children’s Hospital Associate Professor James Tibballs write that the word ‘irreversible’ in the law that defines death is a stumbling block to opening up the potential number of hearts available for transplant.[MORE]

New forms of heart transplant illegal, journal article warns
New heart transplantation methods are against the law and doctors could face criminal charges for carrying out certain types of heart transplant, a medical journal article warns. In a small number of operations, hearts that had stopped beating were removed from donors and restarted before being placed in the recipient patient, but the Medical Journal of Australia article argues the donor was not legally dead at the time because their heart was able to be restarted. [MORE]

Liver transplantation: The effect of new HCV drugs on liver transplantation outcomes
Liver transplantations for patients who are co-infected with HIV and HCV have always posed a challenge and still do, according to the results of a new study. This article discusses the factors that contribute to an increased risk of poor transplantation outcomes and how new treatment options might affect patient survival. [MORE]

Transplant breakthrough as researchers reveal working kidney grown in the lab from stem cells
Scientists say they are a step closer to growing fully functioning replacement kidneys after a breakthrough in results in animals. They used rats as the incubators for the growing embryonic tissue. 
Although still years off human trials, the research helps guide the way towards the end goal of making organs for people, say experts.  [MORE]

PGI Lucknow develops test to predict success of kidney transplant
A new pathological test would be able to predict within 18-hours if a patient of kidney transplant would eventually develop acute kidney failure of not. The condition is responsible for 50% of transplant failures. Developed by nephrologists at Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, the test is non-invasive in nature. It involves isolation of a biomarker called KIM-1 (kidney injury molecule-1) from urine samples. [MORE]

Regional Strategy for Combating Trafficking in Persons and Smuggling of Migrants 2015-2020
UNODC recently launched its Regional Strategy for Combating Trafficking in Persons and Smuggling of Migrants in West and Central Africa. With these two regions considered points of origin, transit and destination for victims of human trafficking and smuggling of migrants, the new Regional Strategy aims to assist the affected countries in dismantling the criminal networks while at the same time protecting the victims of these crimes. [MORE]

Uterus transplantation trials; is deceased donation morally preferable?
In recent years there has been much research on the feasibility of human uterus, or womb, transplantation (UTx). Five pregnancies and three live births have now been recorded from trials in Sweden and Turkey, and more trials are being prepared worldwide. Should research prove fruitful, UTx would allow those who are unable to gestate and birth their own children a much-desired opportunity to become not only social mothers (through adoption or traditional surrogacy arrangements), or genetic and social mothers (through gestational surrogacy) but mothers in all three senses. [MORE]

New rules for organ donation in Iceland?
A group of government and opposition MPs are proposing changing Iceland’s organ donation system from an ‘opt-in’ to an ‘opt-out’ arrangement. Organ donation in Iceland (based on legislation dating back to 1991) currently runs on the principle of ‘presumed refusal’, i.e. organs may be removed from the deceased only with the express prior permission of the individual in question or the permission of their next of kin. This would be reversed under the new proposal, formally moved as a parliamentary bill in the Icelandic Parliament (‘Alþingi’) yesterday. [MORE]

PGI Lucknow develops test to predict success of kidney transplant
A new pathological test would be able to predict within 18-hours if a patient of kidney transplant would eventually develop acute kidney failure of not. The condition is responsible for 50% of transplant failures. Developed by nephrologists at Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, the test is non-invasive in nature. It involves isolation of a biomarker called KIM-1 (kidney injury molecule-1) from urine samples. [MORE]

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