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Keynote Speakers

Professor Duska Dragun

Dragun

Professor Duska Dragun

Duska Dragun is a full professor of medicine and nephrology at the Medical Faculty of Charité University Medicine, Berlin and a chief attending of the Department for Nephrology and Critical Care Medicine, Charité University Hospital Berlin. She is founder and the director of the Charité and Berlin Institute of Health Clinician Scientist.

Duska Dragun is a full professor of medicine and nephrology at the Medical Faculty of Charité University Medicine, Berlin and a chief attending of the Department for Nephrology and Critical Care Medicine, Charité University Hospital Berlin. Beside her clinical and research appointment, she is founder and the director of the Charité and Berlin Institute of Health Clinician Scientist Program supporting 120 clinician scientist fellows among all medical and surgical disciplines fostering translational biomedical research with structured molecular medicine curriculum and protected time for research.

Her research is dedicated to understand mechanisms of acute and chronic rejection organ transplant patients and to identify mechanisms to explain their therapy-refractory course. With combined approach of cohort studies in addition to careful phenotyping, she was able to discover new functional non-HLA antigens and to define new disease entities on the base of mechanistic differences on the level of receptor biology. One example is the introduction of the new concept of biased signaling via autoimmune activation of vascular GPCRs explaining severe pathologies in renal, heart, lung and liver transplants and autoimmune disease that fail to respond to classic immunomodulatory interventions.

She is recipient of numerous national and international awards in nephrology, cardiovascular and transplantation medicine for her research achievements as well as awards for her society engagement exemplified by “Germany - Land of Ideas” award for the Clinician Scientist Program at Charité.

During her career, she has published more than 130 articles in leading peer-reviewed journals including those in Cell and New England Journal of Medicine.

Professor Dragun will address the importance of Non-HLA Antibodies in Transplantation.
Sensitization and the Importance of Alloantibodies
Plenary Symposium session 1
Saturday May 27, 2017
16:30 – 18:00

Dr. Anat Tambur

Tambur

Dr. Anat Tambur

Director of the Transplant Immunology Laboratory and a Research Professor at the Comprehensive Transplant Center, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL. She is the immediate Past President of the American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics (ASHI), and a Board Member of the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS). Anat also served as the President of the American Board for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics (ABHI).

Anat R Tambur the director of the Transplant Immunology Laboratory and a Research Professor at the Comprehensive Transplant Center, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL. She is the immediate Past President of the American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics (ASHI), and a Board Member of the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS). Anat also served as the President of the American Board for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics (ABHI).

Dr. Tambur’s research focuses on understanding the role of donor-specific HLA antibodies in the context of solid organ transplantation with specific emphasis on assessing antibody affinity and strength as a tool for risk stratification in solid organ transplantion. She is also interested in understanding HLA-DQ antigen-antibody interactions and specifically focused on analyzing HLA-DQ epitopes.

Clinically, she is involved with kidney, pancreas, liver, heart, stem cell and double cord blood transplant programs and has contributed mainly to the desensitization program for both kidney and heart transplant recipients as well as to the Kidney Paired Exchange program at Northwestern. Her laboratory is accredited by ASHI as one of the few facilities for HLA Laboratory Director Training. She serves on several Editorial Boards including the American Journal of Transplantation (AJT), Human Immunology, Clinical Transplantation, and HLA.

Professor Dr. Tambur will address the importance of Non-HLA Antibodies in Transplantation.
Sensitization and the Importance of Alloantibodies
Plenary Symposium session 1
Saturday May 27, 2017
16:30 – 18:00

Dr. Carlos Esquivel

EsquivelC

Dr. Carlos Esquivel

Arnold and Barbara Silverman Professor of Surgery, Chief of the Division of Abdominal Transplantation, and the Associate Director of the Institute of Immunity, Transplantation and Infection
Stanford University

Carlos O. Esquivel is The Arnold and Barbara Silverman Professor of Surgery, Chief of the Division of Abdominal Transplantation, and the Associate Director of the Institute of Immunity, Transplantation and Infection, an umbrella institute that fosters interdisciplinary research between basic scientists and clinicians at Stanford University. He received his M.D. degree from the University of Costa Rica, completed general surgery training at the University of California Davis and then obtained a doctoral degree from the University of Lund in Sweden. He trained in transplantation of the liver, kidney, pancreas and intestine at the University of Pittsburgh. In 1995, he was recruited to Stanford to start the Pediatric Transplant Programs. Dr. Esquivel is recognized worldwide as an expert and pioneer in transplantation. He is a creative and productive investigator having contributed more than 300 publications in the medical literature and given over 200 lectures worldwide. He oversees multiple basic science and clinical research projects, and is currently PI for a 5-year, multi-center NIH grant to develop biomarkers for Epstein-Barr Virus-induced post-transplant lymphomas in children. Dr. Esquivel has trained many fellows, many of them remain in academic surgery and many hold positions of leadership in the country. In recognition as an educator, Dr. Esquivel received the ASTS 2015 Francis Moore Excellence in Mentorship in the Field of Transplantation Award. As a transplant leader at Stanford, and in national and international scientific societies, he promotes team cooperation, embraces change and creates an environment for fostering discovery, and for training leaders of the future.

Dr. Esquivel will address the current practice for improving longevity of transplanted organs in children as well as new technologies for monitoring allograft health in his presentation on Improving Graft Longevity: Lessons learned from Pediatric Liver Transplantation.
State-of-the-Art session 4
Monday, May 29, 2017
17:15 – 17:45

Dr. John J. O’Shea

OShea John

Dr. John J. O’Shea

Director, Intramural Research Program at the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS)
National Institutes of Health (NIH)

John J. O'Shea, M.D., graduated Phi Beta Kappa with a Bachelor of Science degree from St. Lawrence University, and received a Doctor of Medicine degree from the University of Cincinnati. He then served as an intern and resident in Internal Medicine at the State University of New York Upstate Medical University in Syracuse, NY. He came to the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in 1981 for subspecialty training in Allergy and Immunology in the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. He did additional postdoctoral work in the Cell Biology and Metabolism Branch in the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. Dr. O’Shea is board certified in Internal Medicine and Allergy and Immunology.

He started his own group in the National Cancer Institute in 1989, and then moved to the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS) in 1994 as Chief of the Lymphocyte Cell Biology Section of the Arthritis and Rheumatism Branch. He was appointed Chief of the Molecular Immunology and Inflammation Branch in 2002, and became Scientific Director and Director of the NIAMS Intramural Research Program in 2005. Dr. O’Shea also served as Acting Director of the NIH Center for Regenerative Medicine from 2009-2011. Dr. O’Shea is also an adjunct Professor in the Department of Pathology at the University of Pennsylvania.

Dr. O'Shea has received a number of awards, including: the U.S. Public Health Service Physician Researcher of the Year Award; the Paul Bunn Award in Infectious Disease; the Lee C. Howley Prize in Arthritis Research; the Irish Society for Immunology Public Lecture Award; a St. Lawrence University honorary degree; and the Ross Prize in Molecular Medicine. He has been the recipient of the National Institutes of Health Director's Award four times (1998, 2008, 2010, 2013). He was elected to the American Association of Physicians, the American Society for Clinical Investigation, and the Institute of Medicine/National Academy of Medicine. He is also an ISI Web of Knowledge “Highly Cited Researcher”. He received the NIAMS Mentoring Award in 2003, and the NIH “Make a Difference” Office of Equal Opportunity Award in 2006. He was selected for the NYU Honors Lectureship, the Danny Thomas Lecture and more, and in 2015 delivered a Nobel Forum Lecture.

Dr. O’Shea has served on the editorial boards of multiple journals, including: Immunity, Journal of Experimental Medicine, Journal of Biological Chemistry, Journal of Immunology, and Blood. He has been an invited lecturer at numerous universities and international meetings in the U.S., Canada, Europe and Asia.
Dr. O'Shea is one of the co-founders of the NIH/Oxford/Cambridge program in Biomedical Science, is a member of NIH-UPENN Immunology Program, and has served as a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Scholars Advisor.

Dr. O'Shea has authored more than 300 articles. His area of scientific interest is cytokine signal transduction, dissecting the role of Jaks and Stats family transcription in immunoregulation. Dr. O'Shea and his colleagues cloned the tyrosine kinase, Jak3, and demonstrated its role in pathogenesis of severe combined immunodeficiency. Dr. O'Shea was awarded two US Patents related to Janus Family Kinases and identification of immune modulators (7,070,972, and 7,488,808). Dr. O'Shea and colleagues at the NIH identified the role of Stat3 in regulating T cell cytokine production in Job's syndrome. More recently, Dr. O’Shea’s laboratory has employed deep sequencing to understand the epigenetic regulation of T cell differentiation and the role of STATs in these processes.

Dr. O’Shea will be presenting on New Strategies for Immunosuppression (JAK-STAT)
State-of-the-Art Presentation 2
Sunday, May 28, 2017
12:30 – 13:00