Save the dates!

 

 

May 7 - 8, 2018
Boston, MA, USA


 

Registration opens soon

STEMCELL18 slide2

In Memoriam: Gian Franco Bottazzo (1946-2017)

gfb

Professor Gian Franco Bottazzo

Awards include:

The Alberto Trisotto International Prize (1978), the Oskar Minkowski Award of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (1982), the Mary Jane Kugel Award of the Juvenile Diabetes Foundation - USA (1984), the RD Award Lawrence of the British Association for the Study of Diabetes (1985), the Diaz Cristobal International Award for the Diabetes Study (1985), the King Feisal International Medicine Award (1986), the Mack-Forster Prize Clinical Research of the European Society of Clinical Research (1987), David Rumbrough Scientific Award of the Juvenile Diabetes Foundation - USA (1987), Francis DW Lukens Medal of the American Association for Diabetes Study, Philadelphia Section (1988), Harington-de Visscher Award from the European Association for Thyroid Study (1988), Gunnar Birke Medal of the Swedish Society of Internal Medicine (1989) and Medal at the Banting Memory of the American Association for the Study of Diabetes (1992).

It is with sadness that IPITA informs you that Gian Franco Bottazzo passed away after a short illness on September 15th in Venice, Italy.  He was 71 and is survived by his wife Lamya and his daughter Dana. Professor Bottazzo was a pioneer in type 1 diabetes research. Over the past several decades, Professor Bottazzo has carried out extensive research on autoimmune diseases, particularly diabetes. In a landmark paper published in 1974 Professor Bottazzo and his colleagues showed that type I diabetes was associated with the development of antibodies directed against the insulin-producing cells; then he went on to demonstrate their predictive value, paving the way to future studies on pathogenesis and natural history of the disease. This pioneering discovery has opened the way to a flood of investigations in the study of autoimmunity as a basic cause of failure, not only of the islet cells of the pancreas leading to type I diabetes mellitus, but also the loss of other endocrine-producing cells such as those in the thyroid and pituitary glands. Professor Bottazzo was a father figure of the diabetes research community. He was innovative, creative, controversial, and brought life and debate to scientific meetings. We have lost a leader and mentor for many diabetes researchers, and a part of our history.

Gian Franco Bottazzo was born in Venice on 1.8.1946. Graduated in Medicine and Surgery in 1971 (University of Padua), he specialized in 1974 in Clinical Allergology and Immunology (University of Florence) and Endocrinology (University of Padua) in 1979. From 1973 to 1991 he was Professor of Immunology at the Middlesex Hospital in London. In 1991 he took over the Department of Immunology at London Hospital Medical College in London, which he held until 1998, the year he was appointed as Scientific Director of the Pediatric Child Hospital Bambin Gesù of Rome, Italy.

To demonstrate its importance in the history of diabetes research, Professor Bottazzo has been awarded numerous awards including: The Alberto Trisotto International Prize (1978), the Oskar Minkowski Award of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (1982), the Mary Jane Kugel Award of the Juvenile Diabetes Foundation - USA (1984), the RD Award Lawrence of the British Association for the Study of Diabetes (1985), the Diaz Cristobal International Award for the Diabetes Study (1985), the King Feisal International Medicine Award (1986), the Mack-Forster Prize Clinical Research of the European Society of Clinical Research (1987), David Rumbrough Scientific Award of the Juvenile Diabetes Foundation - USA (1987), Francis DW Lukens Medal of the American Association for Diabetes Study, Philadelphia Section (1988), Harington-de Visscher Award from the European Association for Thyroid Study (1988), Gunnar Birke Medal of the Swedish Society of Internal Medicine (1989) and Medal at the Banting Memory of the American Association for the Study of Diabetes (1992).

President's Update

Jon Odorico

You may have caught the Google banner on November 14th, celebrating Fred Banting’s 125th birthday. Banting and Best in Professor Macleod’s lab at the University of Toronto in 1921made the seminal discovery of insulin by first ligating the pancreatic duct to eliminate acinar tissue from the pancreas which was probably inhibiting the isolation of the hormone because the enzymes were digesting it!

November 14th was also World Diabetes Day! If you are like me, you missed this primarily because we spend most of our working lives immersed in trying to care for patients with diabetes in the clinic and/or cure diabetes in the lab.

Finally, Dec 17, 2016 was the 50th anniversary of the first successful pancreas transplantation in humans performed by Walter Kelly and Richard Lillehei in 1966 at the University of Minnesota. So, as our diabetic patients are enjoying holiday treats this season, they can be thankful for the work of these pioneers, many years ago, who forged a new frontier in the treatment of diabetes.

Continue Reading

IPITA Webinars

ipita webinars 2017

TTS-IPITA WEBINAR RECORDING FEBRUARY 16, 2017 IS POSTED

PANCREAS TRANSPLANTATION FOR TYPE 2 DIABETES : INDICATION AND PATIENT SELECTION
Speaker: Matthew Cooper

Overview:

Despite a clear demonstration of the benefits of solid-organ pancreas transplantation for patients with diabetes mellitus, volumes continue to decrease throughout the US. Improvements in quality of life and the ability to abrogate the complications of dysregulated glucose control has now allowed the procedure to be offered to many with Type 2 DM. Indications and patient selection, however, are critical both to individual outcomes and to further advance national support of pancreas transplantation for all. This webinar will share both published data and personal experience on program resources and patient demographics that remain important in the evaluation and transplantation of patients with Type 2 DM.

Click here to view (You must be logged into the website)