Official Sections CTRMS ISVCA IPITA IPTA ISODP IRTA IXA SPLIT TID

2013 - ISBTS 2013 Symposium


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Mini-Oral Communications 1

12.246 - Micronutrient deficiency is common in intestinal transplant patients after successful transition to enteral nutrition

Presenter: Conrad, Cole, , United States
Authors: Agozie Ubesie1, Conrad Cole1, Jaimie Nathan1,2, Greg Tiao1,2, Maria Alonso1,2, Adam Mezoff1,2, Samuel Kocoshis1,2

Micronutrient deficiency is common in intestinal transplant patients after successful transition to enteral nutrition

Agozie Ubesie1, Conrad Cole1, Jaimie Nathan1,2, Greg Tiao1,2, Maria Alonso1,2, Adam Mezoff1,2, Samuel Kocoshis1,2

1Intestinal Care Center, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH, United States; 2Intestinal Transplant program, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH, United States

Background:Intestinal transplant recipients are at risk for micronutrient deficiency due to the process of post-transplant adaptation. Patients are typically supplemented with micronutrients during parenteral nutrition; however the risk of deficiency may persist even after a successful transition to full enteral nutrition.
Objective:To determine the prevalence of, and associated risk factors for, iron, zinc, magnesium, phosphorus, selenium, copper, folate, vitamins A, D, E and B12 deficiency in pediatric intestinal transplant recipients after successful transition to full enteral nutrition.
Method:A retrospective review of prospectively collected data from children who underwent intestinal transplantation at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center. Deficiencies of various micronutrients were defined using the hospital reference values.
Results:Twenty-one intestinal transplant recipients, aged one to 23 years that were successfully transitioned to full enteral nutrition were included in the study. The prevalence of micronutrient deficiency was 95.2%.  The common deficient micronutrients were iron (94.7%) and magnesium (90.5%).  Anemia was documented in 95.2% of the patients. Age ≤10 years (P=0.002) and tube feeding (P= 0.02) were significant risk factors for micronutrient deficiencies.
Conclusion: Pediatric intestinal transplant recipients have a high risk of micronutrient deficiency, especially minerals. Deficiencies were more common among younger patients and those who received jejunal tube feeding.


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